Category Archives: Recommended link

National Feral Cat Management Survey

Photo by Fredy MercayDid you know?

Australia has the highest extinction rate of native species on earth. The impact of feral cats has been recognised as one of the major threats to Australia’s native and endangered wildlife. In many cases, feral cats could be the final threat that causes a species to become extinct.

This is the first study of its kind.

Researchers from RMIT University are looking for volunteers to participate in a survey that asks questions about feral cat management in Australia. The information collected will help to generate a better understanding of feral cat management across the nation, including how to make improvements.

You can help by participating in this survey.

The survey should take around 5 mins. There are no identifying questions asked – you will remain anonymous. You will be asked a couple of non-identifying demographic questions (e.g., age range, occupation and State/Territory of residence). You are under no obligation to answer any questions.

If you would like to participate in this survey and help with this research please visit the following link: National Feral Cat Management Survey

Off Track (ABC Radio National)

G’morning all,

I’ve been listening to lots of Off Track, a great program on ABC Radio National. Some of the shows might tickle the ICSRGs’ fancy.

From unused pool to ecosystem cool – on transforming pools to ponds.

Bandicoots in Sydney Backyards – featuring the fantastic phrase ‘snout pokes’.

Loving your environment to death – on recreational use of nature reserves near urban areas.

Happy weekends to all,

Kate

A values-based approach to urban nature research

Chris Ives has just  essay posted on The Nature of Cities website:

“Start with people. Adopting a values-based approach to understanding urban ecological systems will challenge how land use and environmental management decisions are typically made. Rather than fitting the importance of urban nature into current paradigms of decision-making (often based on economic values and balancing fiscal budgets), public values can be used as a way of engaging people in the decision-making process of our cities. Beginning with an understanding of what people value and why, urban nature can be embedded more closely into the life of a city, rather than being presented as an alternative issue that only resonates with the environmentally conscious few.”

The full article can be found at
http://www.thenatureofcities.com/?p=6238